Author Topic: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...  (Read 526 times)

4stringer77

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2017, 07:01:25 AM »
Shouldn't these songs be considered blues?



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westen44

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2017, 09:08:43 AM »
I would still consider all that country, unless some people might call Leann Rimes pop or pop country. 


4stringer77

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2017, 09:39:01 AM »
I know, just being silly.
Contrary to what James Bond says, a good Gibson should be stirred, not shaken.

westen44

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2017, 09:44:16 AM »
Oh, I only got 4 hours of sleep and I'm probably not capable of knowing if someone is being silly or not.  I need sleep and 4 hours doesn't cut it. 

Pilgrim

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2017, 10:13:34 AM »
A lot of music has feet in more than one genre. A country artist singing a tune with typical country lyrics, but in a blues beat using a classic blues chord progression, is a pretty good example.
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Dave W

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2017, 01:32:45 PM »
A lot of music has feet in more than one genre. A country artist singing a tune with typical country lyrics, but in a blues beat using a classic blues chord progression, is a pretty good example.

True. Hank Williams' Lovesick Blues was originally written for a musical and first recorded in the early 1920s. The 1928 recording by Emmett Miller, a white singer who performed in blackface, inspired Hank's version.




slinkp

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2017, 03:27:35 PM »
Quote
A lot of music has feet in more than one genre.
Absolutely! That's just how popular music of all kinds evolves.  And always has done. Arguing about correct classification of things is a fun hobby for us all, but it doesn't matter much in the end, does it?

uwe

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2017, 04:05:39 PM »
Nope.

And I'm really enjoying the Midland CD spinning on my office stereo as I write. Garth Brooks-ish to the max though (the way the singer intonates), but that is not an insult in my book. Excellent production too.
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D.M.N.

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2017, 07:14:59 PM »
I've never really understood the propensity for the overly exaggerated accent especially in modern country bands. There's plenty of C&W without such put on accents, Marty Robbins, Alan Jackson (there's a twang but it doesn't sound ridiculous), even some of Hank Williams stuff doesn't have that thick of an accent. A lot of the modern stuff sounds like they're singing a pastiche bordering on parody of the "country accent". About the only accent I can put up with currently for much time is Sturgill Simpson. As far as country rock, I'd far prefer without the accent more like Commander Cody or Doug Sahm.

westen44

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2017, 07:46:55 PM »
I've never really understood the propensity for the overly exaggerated accent especially in modern country bands. There's plenty of C&W without such put on accents, Marty Robbins, Alan Jackson (there's a twang but it doesn't sound ridiculous), even some of Hank Williams stuff doesn't have that thick of an accent. A lot of the modern stuff sounds like they're singing a pastiche bordering on parody of the "country accent". About the only accent I can put up with currently for much time is Sturgill Simpson. As far as country rock, I'd far prefer without the accent more like Commander Cody or Doug Sahm.

I think you've hit the nail on the head with your analysis of what's going on with the accent.  As for Marty Robbins, just the song "El Paso" is legendary.  Personally, though, I consider him Western but not really country.  Alan Jackson is country, IMO.  I think he's really good.  But I don't listen to his music I think mostly because many times the lyrics seem to hit too close to home.  Hank Williams can do that, too.  But I can listen to him.  He is the only country artist I can listen to for extended periods. 

Dave W

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #25 on: November 04, 2017, 07:22:35 AM »
The older guys who sang with accents had those accents in real life. Even if they were city boys, their families had come to the city from smaller towns and rural areas.

A lot of modern "country" is just douchebag party boy rock with completely phony accents.

4stringer77

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #26 on: November 04, 2017, 08:36:48 AM »
Interesting bit of info regarding the Emmet Miller inspiration. Very cool to hear how something originating in a Jazz band setting could find it's way to Hank and his trademark voice break yodel.
Contrary to what James Bond says, a good Gibson should be stirred, not shaken.

Highlander

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #27 on: November 04, 2017, 12:18:26 PM »
Jackie's perception of "modern country" is early and latter Tanya Tucker and Alan Jackson... She quite likes Emmylou too... ;)
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Pilgrim

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #28 on: November 04, 2017, 02:33:21 PM »
I just think of modern country as pop music with badly mashed western straw hats and pickup trucks.
Good sloppy playing is an art in itself. (Uwe)

Granny Gremlin

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Re: For Dave: Yet another C&W authenticity test ...
« Reply #29 on: November 06, 2017, 06:08:09 AM »
A lot of modern "country" is just douchebag party boy rock with completely phony accents.

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